Preparing for Sunday’s crochet/knit-in at the Grafton Regional Gallery are Beanies for Babies needlemasters Danielle Deefholts, Judy Hackett and Reece Lancaster.
Preparing for Sunday’s crochet/knit-in at the Grafton Regional Gallery are Beanies for Babies needlemasters Danielle Deefholts, Judy Hackett and Reece Lancaster. Adam Hourigan

Keeping bubs warm

THE Beanies for Babies project – aimed at warming bubs exposed to the cold in northern Japan post-earthquake – has struck a chord with the Clarence Valley.

Dozens of items are already being donated by the Valley's crafty populace and interest in the project is high, with a crochet/knitting day planned for this Sunday and next Sunday at Georgie's Cafe inside the Grafton Regional Gallery from 10am.

Plunger coffee, tea and a few bikkies will be provided, thanks to Georgie's operator Judy Hackett, who jumped on board the project early, not only for its charity value but also as a chance to teach a new generation some traditional skills so they weren't lost.

“The devastation in Japan is so overwhelming for us all to understand,” she said.

“This initiative by Danielle is a wonderful example of the way women contribute to solving overwhelming problems by jumping in anywhere and getting on with it.”

Freshly crocheted jumpers and beanies and even balls of wool have already been donated and Beanies for Babies organiser Danielle Deefholts said she had arranged a recipient of the woollies – the Japanese arm of the international charity Second Harvest.

Jan Marsh said she was so touched by the cause that she had to do something, but she had no idea how to knit or crochet.

“She donated some very nice wool instead, so I made a beanie out of one ball the other night and I'll make more on Sunday,” Danielle said.

“We've had people offer to help pay for postage through our Facebook page, and we've had lots of encouragement.”

Project member Reece Lancaster said there were so many knitters and crocheters in the Valley that this was one of the best ways our area could help the Japanese.

“It's so direct too, you are cutting out the middle man ... and it's a good way to use your stash,” she said.

Items can be dropped at The Daily Examiner offices in Grafton or Yamba or the Discount Drug Store in Grafton Mall.

The Daily Examiner has agreed to pay for two lots of postage to Japan – one this Monday and one the following Monday.



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