Dr Peter Catt at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/John Gass
Dr Peter Catt at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/John Gass

Priest vows to block Adani bulldozers

ONE of Queensland's leading Christian figures has vowed to block bulldozers in a bid to stop Adani's mega-mine going ahead, and called on followers of other religions to join him.

Dr Peter Catt, Dean of St John's Anglican Cathedral in Brisbane, issued the rallying call at a "carols for the earth" concert in Brisbane last night.

"As a Christian, caring for Creation means putting that care into practice. If necessary, I will stand in front of Adani bulldozers to make political leaders take our climate emergency seriously," he said.

"I'm calling on people of all faiths to take this same step, as well as people who don't identify with any faith tradition. The time to act is now.

"The proper political channels are failing us. When scientists tell us we are in danger of civilisation collapse unless we take very bold and urgent action, what else can we do?"

Dr Peter Catt at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/John Gass
Dr Peter Catt at St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Brisbane. Picture: AAP/John Gass

Dr Catt is a member of the Australian Religious Response to Climate Change which plans to send recruits to the anti-Adani blockade campsite near Bowen early in 2019.

He said he hoped protests against would not lead to him and others being arrested, but was prepared for that.

"If that's the cost of civil disobedience, OK," he said.

Dr Catt said he wanted to generate a similar response to the multi-faith protests against sending 12-month-old asylum-seeker Baby Asha to a detention centre on Nauru in 2016.

"Thousands of people of faith stood shoulder to shoulder," he said.

 

Anti-Adani coal mine protestors engage in a sit-in protest outside the Queensland government headquarters in Brisbane on Wednesday. Picture: AAP/Dan Peled
Anti-Adani coal mine protestors engage in a sit-in protest outside the Queensland government headquarters in Brisbane on Wednesday. Picture: AAP/Dan Peled

 

While he had not asked Archbishop Phillip Aspinall's permission, "it is consistent with church teaching that the planet is sacred - it is not radical".

And the dean took aim at politicians, who talked publicly about their Christianity but supported projects that would contribute to climate change.

"People need to understand that the faith sees the planet as a gift and if you are not seeing that, you might need to reflect," he said.

Galilee Blockade activist group spokesman Ben Pennings welcomed the involvement of religious groups.

"From Martin Luther King to Gandhi, people of faith have been crucial to social change. Religious leaders standing up to stop new coal mines is a powerful statement to politicians still sitting on the fence while our future is at risk," he said.



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