Health visitor and a senior woman during home visit. A nurse talking to an elderly woman in an wheelchair.
Health visitor and a senior woman during home visit. A nurse talking to an elderly woman in an wheelchair. Halfpoint

Let's talk about death and dying

IT'S all about creating an open discussion about death and dying right now with National Palliative Care week.

Northern NSW Local Health District will be hosting information stands in the Clarence Valley as part of National Palliative Care Week from 20-26 May.

To help the community get involved with these discussions, information stalls will be held at most facilities throughout the LHD this week, as well as at Grafton Shopping World.

This year, we're asking the community to think about 'What Matters Most?' to start a conversation around what would be most important to them if they became seriously unwell.

End of Life Care Project Officer Anna Law of NNSWLHD said dying is a normal part of life, so it is important for all Australians to have discussions about death and dying and the type of care they would want to receive if they could no longer speak for themselves.

"By having the conversation with their loved ones and health professionals, people can ensure their treatment and care best aligns with their values and preferences regarding both the type and place of care and place of death,” she said.

"We encourage everyone to discuss their end-of-life wishes with their loved ones and health care team using the Dying to Talk Resources. Knowing what is important to you will reduce their burden at a difficult time and ensure you get the care you desire,” Anna said.

They are also celebrating and thanking palliative care workers for making a difference in people's lives during Palliative Care Week.

In conjunction with National Palliative Care Week, NSW Health yesterday released findings from a NSW Government survey which sought community views on how local palliative care needs can best be met.

NSW Health Deputy Secretary Dr Nigel Lyons said the Palliative Care Survey attracted 2,000 responses, which will be used to develop an End of Life Framework for NSW.

"The responses show overwhelming support for priorities that were identified through roundtable meetings and consultation workshops the NSW Government held last year, including calls for a more skilled workforce and patient-centred care,” Dr Lyons said.



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