The Simpsons’ beloved character Apu could potentially be killed off the show.
The Simpsons’ beloved character Apu could potentially be killed off the show.

Longtime Simpsons character may be killed off

ONE of The Simpsons' most beloved characters may be about to be killed off after becoming the subject of a controversial documentary.

Indian immigrant and Kwik-E-Mart owner Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, who first appeared in season one, episode eight, is one of the most familiar faces in Springfield after 29 seasons.

Last month, a documentary by comedian and child of Indian migrants Hari Kondabolu aired - called The Problem With Apu - which explored how the character was created and continues to exist all these years later.

"I spent a lot of time revisiting Apu episodes," The Problem's director Michael Melamedoff told The Washington Post.

"Of course, the character has moments of real wit and insight, because the writing team at The Simpsons was great. But a lot of those moments are also blanketed by very cheap jokes that come at the expense of South Asian culture and South Asian experiences."

Is Apu a comedic character or racist stereotype? Picture: Fox via AP
Is Apu a comedic character or racist stereotype? Picture: Fox via AP

Brooklyn-based Kondabolu said he has been "taunted" by the show's portrayal of Apu for the past 30 years.

"Everything with Apu is like this running joke," he told the NY Times . "And the running joke is that he's Indian."

Hank Azaria, who voices Apu, has now broken his silence and hinted there's a possibility he could be killed off the show.

Azaria told TMZ the documentary had made some "interesting" points about racist stereotyping, and that there is "a lot to digest".

"[To hear that] anybody that was hurt or offended by any character or vocal performance is really upsetting, that it was offensive or hurtful to anybody," he said.

If Apu does meet an untimely death, he'll follow in the footsteps of other show favourites including Maude Flanders and - most recently - Krusty the Clown's father, Rabbi Hyman Krustofski.



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