BUCKET JOB: Daily Examiner staff cop a drenching from a specially made ice bucket machine made at the Grafton Men’s Shed.
BUCKET JOB: Daily Examiner staff cop a drenching from a specially made ice bucket machine made at the Grafton Men’s Shed. Adam Hourigan

$1.05m raised for MND through Ice Bucket Challenge

YOU may remember The Daily Examiner's mega dunking machine that ensured the majority of staff copped a nice big dump of freezing water on their cowering figures last September to support Motor Neurone Disease (MND) research through the Australian Ice Bucket Challenge.

And in case you missed it, here's the proof:

Kindly constructed by Grafton's Men's Shed, the dunking machine was gingerly levered into action in the office's front car park, and, after a very humiliating dry-run because of logistical issues (we didn't know where to stand), the next attempt resulted in the desired outcome of being smashed with a dozen buckets of Esky-temperature water. This display of screaming adults was appreciated by the small but supportive group of onlookers. And while the office raised a mere $100 for its efforts that sum was added to a pool that translated into more than $1 million.

Thanks to the support of Australians last year, the $1.05 million raised means MND Australia has enough to pool a team of experts to find treatments for motor neurone disease (MND).

Research Committee chairman Professor Matthew Kiernan said it would be the largest collaborative project undertaken in Australia in the search for new motor neurone disease risk genes and therapies.

"Who would have thought that buckets of icy water would be such a powerful weapon?," Professor Kiernan said.

"We thank every one of the 30,000-plus soggy Australians who helped to catapult motor neurone disease into the global spotlight and donated to advance research."

The Daily Examiner dedicated its dunking to its friend and former Ginger Meggs cartoonist James Kemsley, who visited Grafton and the Clarence Valley on a number of occasions as part of the Ginger Meggs Cricket Squad in the 1990s to play several exhibition matches in the Clarence against a Vanuatu team as part of its annual exchange.

Mr Kemsley died from MND in 2007 aged 59.

What IS MND?

MND is a progressive, terminal neurological disease.

In most cases the cause is not known and there is no effective treatment and no known cure.

People with MND progressively lose the use of their limbs and ability to speak, swallow and breathe, while their mind and senses usually remain intact.

Average life expectancy is two to three years after diagnosis.

Around 2000 people have MND in Australia.

For more information about MND visit http://www.mndaustralia.org.



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