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Miranda Kerr slammed for ‘dangerous’ COVID-19 advice

Aussie supermodel Miranda Kerr has been slammed for spreading the "dangerous'' and "irresponsible'' advice of a controversial "medical medium'' as a way to protect yourself against the coronavirus.

The former Victoria's Secret angel and skincare brand owner shared a post on Instagram to her 12 million followers, promoting a "Virus Protection'' guide from medical medium Anthony William. William has no medical qualifications and his advice and theories have courted controversy for years.

He has said his advice comes from "communication with gods'' and that celery juice is the greatest healing tonic of all time.

Miranda Kerr spruiked a “Virus Protection’’ guide from medical medium Anthony William to her 12 million Instagram followers.
Miranda Kerr spruiked a “Virus Protection’’ guide from medical medium Anthony William to her 12 million Instagram followers.

Kerr, the wife of billionaire Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel and mum of three, was not met with the usual adoration from her followers upon sharing William's manual.

British NHS doctor Joshua Wolrich commented: "ABSOLUTELY NOT. Do better with your influence. This 'virus protection' guide is full of unscientific nonsense that has ZERO medical validity … Misinformation is dangerous. Stop spreading it."

Hundreds of commenters echoed Dr Wolrich's disapproval of Kerr sharing the subject matter, calling it "dangerous", "tone deaf", "irresponsible" and "shameful".

 

They also pointed out that William has no medical qualifications and was spreading harmful misinformation.

The 33-page guide Kerr promoted primarily focuses on foods to avoid and prioritise. It claims eggs are the main products people should avoid eating because they are "the number one food viruses like to feed on".

William also prescribes celery juice and cucumber juice to fend off viruses as well as elderberry syrup, thyme tea and nine different supplements including cat's claw and lemon balm.

Miranda Kerr has angered fans and health professionals alike. Picture: Instagram
Miranda Kerr has angered fans and health professionals alike. Picture: Instagram

Australian Medical Association NSW President Dr Kean-Seng Lim said the spreading of such disinformation at a time when evidence- based advice is crucial can be fatal.

"Disinformation is dangerous because it can lead people to do the wrong thing or delay seeking advice," he said.

"Staying at home drinking celery juice might actually delay you from doing something that is actually going to work, such as seeking qualified medical treatment.

"In times of uncertainty it is very easy for disinformation to get started and this can actually be very dangerous as it causes confusion and panic.

"And if we are going to get through this coronavirus epidemic successfully we all need to be following good evidence-based advice."

The Daily Telegraph has contacted Kerr for comment.

 



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