Iluka Board Riders member Ian ‘Cookie’ Cook practises for the upcoming mullet-throwing competition as part of the Iluka Living the Good Life Festival.
Iluka Board Riders member Ian ‘Cookie’ Cook practises for the upcoming mullet-throwing competition as part of the Iluka Living the Good Life Festival. Debrah Novak

Fishy comp is set to lure 'em in

CALLING all tossers.

The long-lost tradition of mullet throwing is to be revived as part of this month's Living the Good Life Festival to be held in Iluka on Saturday, September 17.

The Iluka Fishing Club will be running the mullet throwing competition, which is open to kids, adults and pensioners for just $1.

Roy Becker, Iluka Fishing Club president, said the abundance of the river and ocean had supported the Iluka community for many generations.

"We'd like to acknowledge that and celebrate it, while also encouraging people to look after it for the future," he said.

Festival organiser Anya Light said as far as she knew it had been at least 25 years since the last Iluka mullet throwing contest.

"It's quirky, it's lighthearted, it's fun and it's a real way to remind us of where we live," she said.

"The reality is that the humble mullet is one of the mainstays of Iluka."

Ms Light said the practical theme continued with activities including tracking and "reading the country".

There will also be a backyard chicken-keeping workshop run by "chicken whisperer" Ray Imlach, and community gardens and permaculture with Ron Jurd from Yamba community gardens.

Information is available at livingthegoodlifefest.com.



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