WELCOME RELIEF: Paul Monteath, of Jackadgery, is overjoyed his dog Indy has recovered from life-threatening paralysis ticks. Photo: Adam Hourigan
WELCOME RELIEF: Paul Monteath, of Jackadgery, is overjoyed his dog Indy has recovered from life-threatening paralysis ticks. Photo: Adam Hourigan

Natural remedies get tick for saving loved dog

WHEN Paul Monteath's best mate Indy stopped eating, drinking and could hardly walk, he knew something was wrong.

But without wads of cash to hand over the counter, he was unable to give his seven-year-old blue heeler the treatment she needed.

With two paralysis ticks, Indy was in a dangerous place and Mr Monteath knew he had to act straight away.

"I rang the vet and they said I needed $500 cash to start with, but it could cost up to $1200," he said.

"I'm unemployed - there's no way I could afford that."

Gutted, Mr Monteath phoned Happy Paws to see if someone there had any suggestions. They did.

"They put us in contact with Carole Bryant - a naturopath," Mr Monteath said.

"She said there were no guarantees her treatment would work, and it depended on how much work I did, but she gave me some drops and vitamin C powder and a bit of saline and all up it cost me $36."

A few days of treatment and Indy was back on her feet, back to her normal, happy self.

"It was amazing. I just wanted to tell everyone about it," Mr Monteath said.

"People should know there are other options if you can't afford the vet."

Ms Bryant said she did not claim to be a vet, or a guaranteed healer, but knew her treatments could help through personal experience. "The ideal situation is to take the animal to the vet in the first instance, but if they can't afford that, this is better than doing nothing," she said.

"I am confident in it and I know it works, but it's not straightforward and you do have to put work into it.

"I do it with my animals and have seen its success."

Ms Bryant said the vitamin C worked as a detoxifier and with the other homeopathic remedies it could help fight the effects of paralysis ticks.

Dr Laura Piddington, of Yamba Veterinarian Clinic, said despite success with some natural remedies, a vet should be your first port of call if your animal has a paralysis tick.

"Paralysis ticks can be so unpredictable so if you notice changes, the best thing to do is contact your vet."



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