People are giving away toilet paper.
People are giving away toilet paper.

Now people are giving away toilet paper!

PEOPLE are giving away toilet paper. You read it correctly. When they manage to snag a pack of four rolls, they're donating two to others not so lucky.

What a sweet antidote to all the ugliness we've been seeing lately as coronavirus fears turn people feral (although I suspect some already were).

In Ascot, Hamilton, Clayfield and Hendra - all suburbs besieged by crime gangs and opportunistic thieves of late - residents are proving that generosity never goes out of style.

As well as donating rolls of loo paper, they're arranging drop-offs of food and other necessities to people unable to get to the shops.

People are giving away toilet paper.
People are giving away toilet paper.

When Tricia Steffen, who runs the 4007/4011 community noticeboard on Facebook, asked for ideas from the site's 10,000-plus members on how to stave off loneliness in the elderly or those self-isolating, she drew a huge response.

Among the suggestions: children writing letters (by hand) to anyone who is lonely; calling people to check they are OK (on landlines); and even a non-Christmas version of carolling by young singers and musicians. How very retro, and refreshing!

Small gestures can have big impacts, and it proves to me that kindness still exists in our communities and now, more than ever, kindness is what we need (yes, and loo paper).

We might be in the grip of a pandemic. But that's no excuse to behave like pigs. In fact, it's even more reason to pony up and act like human beings.

Thugs vandalising the vehicles of hospital staff working their butts off to care for the overwhelming volume of Queenslanders presenting to emergency departments amid the COVID-19 outbreak make my blood boil.

How dare they?

Police officers watch on as people queue for toilet paper, paper towel and pasta at a Coles Supermarket. Picture: AAP Image/James Gourley
Police officers watch on as people queue for toilet paper, paper towel and pasta at a Coles Supermarket. Picture: AAP Image/James Gourley

 

Staff at Logan Hospital deserve medals, not misery.

So do the others adapting to what is being called one of the worst crises in 100 years.

Is it OK to steal supplies just because they are hard to find by orthodox methods? No.

And getting into fisticuffs over loo paper? Children being knocked to the ground in stampedes? Irate shoppers bashing supermarket staff? Seriously people, get a grip.

I was in the IGA at Noosa Junction this week when a bloke lost his proverbial when confronted with bare shelves where toilet paper used to be.

I kid you not, this is what he yelled out: "Chinese c---s".

Tough times should not fuel division but emphasise our common humanity.

Claire Parviz, who owns Spaghetti House Trattoria in South Bank and CJ's Pasta in West End is personally delivering lasagne to loyal customers as she battles to keep her businesses afloat.

She is also feeding her casual staff who she's had to let go amid dwindling trade and who are struggling to pay rent in a foreign country without family support.

 

Source - World Health Organization, Johns Hopkins, other media

 

Singer Naomi Price, who first shot to fame on The Voice, has helped raise almost $30,000 for creatives crippled by the fallout from coronavirus.

She and her Little Red Company live streamed a concert, fittingly called The IsoLate Show, last night on social media, with all proceeds being administered by the Actors' and Entertainers' Benevolent Fund.

Ms Price has also offered to pick up and drop off groceries to anyone in need, as have university students who also have more time on their hands than usual.

Good on them.

Gestures don't need to be grandiose to be appreciated.

 

A notice informing customers of new restrictions at Coles Supermarkets. Picture: AAP Image/James Gourley
A notice informing customers of new restrictions at Coles Supermarkets. Picture: AAP Image/James Gourley

As coronavirus sends more and more businesses to the wall, leaving families scrambling to make ends meet, we will be given even more opportunities to reach out and help others.

Decent people will get creative and come up with things we've not yet even thought of in order to make a difference.

Yes, there will be grubs who seek to profit from others' misery.

And I predict we will see a spike in robberies and other crimes as a result.

But for our own sanity and the good of our communities, what is important to remember - amid all the panic buying, frazzled tempers, cancelled plans and very real concerns over the health and safety of our loved ones - is that you can't put a price on kindness.

You can, however, ensure that supplies of it don't run out. Over to you.

Kylie Lang is the associate editor of The Courier-Mail

kylie.lang@news.com.au

Originally published as Now people are giving away toilet paper!



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