PICTURE PERFECT: Zol Straub’s photo Nullabor Dusk has been shortlisted as one of the best 10 entrants in the Sony World Photography Awards. Photo: Contributed
PICTURE PERFECT: Zol Straub’s photo Nullabor Dusk has been shortlisted as one of the best 10 entrants in the Sony World Photography Awards. Photo: Contributed

Nullabor Dusk shoots Zol to world acclaim

YAMBA-BASED photographer Zol Straub has finally gained recognition on the world stage after he was shortlisted in the Sony World Photography Awards for his photo Nullabor Dusk.

For Mr Straub this has been a long journey with a very humbling outcome.

"I'm 66-years-old and I've been photographing since I was about 12," Mr Straub said.

"I had my own dark room and used to develop my own prints.

"Since the digital era, I've just had a ball because it is so much easier.

"Just the instantaneous ability to review what you have done is so much more helpful.

"Before it was a bit like a shoot and pray, whereas now you get instant feedback from the camera and know what to adjust.

"Back in the day you had nowhere near the flexibility you have now."

Mr Straub has been entering local competitions for many years now with good success, however, it is the step up to the world stage that has him over the moon.

"I love living in the Clarence area," he said. "I have competed in the local competitions and done quite well but to now be competing on the world stage is such a humbling achievement."

Mr Straub's photo was shortlisted as one of the best 10 entrants out of 78,000 entries from people right across the globe.

"When you look at the other shortlisted photos, it is just amazing to be in this company. I know I won't win against these amazing photographers but it's just a blessing being amongst them."

In making the photo Nullabor Dusk, Mr Straub used a photography technique called light painting. He explained that to take the photo he took about 30 different images of the same scene at night with a 15-second exposure for each shot.

While the photo is being taken, he would quite literally paint the foreground in light from a torch to give the scene depth and texture.

With the 20 images taken he then puts them into Photoshop to layer the photos on top of each other at different intensities to eventually come up with the final image.

"Something like this, I probably spend an hour photographing," he said.

"Then 10-20 hours on Photoshop blending the light so it all blends together seamlessly in the one image."



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