Harry Smith, Georgie Smith and Lachlan Eyers on the beach access track.
Harry Smith, Georgie Smith and Lachlan Eyers on the beach access track.

On track to snake bite, mum warns

A MOTHER is upset that an overgrown access track at the northern end of Pippi Beach has put her son at risk of snake bite.

Rosie Smith said her son, Harry, 10, this week encountered a brown snake.

Harry knew enough about snakes to stay still before gently backing away from the curious reptile.

“The beach access is a disgrace; the only reason that they remain open is through people forging their way through,” Ms Smith said.

She grew up in Grafton and visits her parents every school holidays. Ms Smith said she had watched the tracks degenerate over the years.

“I think the regeneration has been fantastic and I understand that this is where snakes live but I am disappointed with the level of upkeep, especially since Pippi Beach is council patrolled in summer,” she said.

Ms Smith said she had written to Clarence Valley Council last year about her concerns, to no apparent avail.

While council’s bush regenerators on the ground say that the area could do with a bit of a prune, the view that snakes are a part of the natural habitat and cannot be avoided is held by those that work closely with the environment.

Council deputy general manager Des Schroder said putting up signs to alert the public to snakes was not on the agenda.

“The risk does not warrant the response of putting up a sign,” he said.




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