Menu
Lifestyle

Only 5% of Aussie children eat enough fruit and vegetables

Dark green vegetables like broccoli can help fight cancer and boost the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs according to new research. Photo: Contributed
Dark green vegetables like broccoli can help fight cancer and boost the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs according to new research. Photo: Contributed Photo: Contributed

ALARMING new figures from the Australian Bureau of Statistics show 94.6 % of children are not getting the recommended daily intake of fruit and vegetables.

The results from the 2014-15 National Health Survey, conducted by the ABS and designed to collect a wide range of information about the health of Australians, revealed only 5.4 per cent of children aged 2-18 years met the guidelines for the recommended daily serves of vegetables.

The Australian Dietary Guidelines recommend that children eat five serves of vegetables a day to ensure they receive the necessary nutrients to grow and develop into healthy adults.

AUSVEG spokesperson Dimi Kyriakou said the statistics were particularly concerning given one in four children are considered overweight or obese.

"This is a great opportunity for parents to encourage their kids to get involved in the preparation and cooking of healthy dinners, as cementing these healthy eating habits from a young age will ensure that they continue throughout their child's lifetime," she said.

"Vegetables can be a star addition to any breakfast, lunch and dinner, and it is important for children to think of vegetables as an essential part of their daily diet."

Guidelines indicate that one serving of vegetables is equivalent to half a cup of cooked vegetables, half a medium potato, or one cup of salad vegetables.

"Australians are fortunate to have access to a wide range of clean, green and safe veggies that can turn any meal into a delicious and healthy option for the whole family," said Ms Kyriakou.

"The benefits of vegetables have been widely documented and reinforce the important role that vegetables play in maintaining a healthy diet."



Rebels real-life warrior on the mend after surgery

AT LEFT: South Grafton Rebels captain Grant Stevens runs into a Matt Cheeseman tackle against the Coffs Harbour Comets during the 2017 Group 2 season. ABOVE: Stevens knee after the successful surgery this week.

After putting up with pain for years, Stevens forced into surgery.

How a baby bird was put back in its 40m high nest

A royal spoonbill chick was rescued by WIRES Northern Rivers volunteers at Alstonville.

Returning this chick to its loving parents was no easy task

Local Partners

Mystery over ‘home birth’ death

UPDATE: Hospital Chief Executive says woman who died at Ipswich Hospital in December arrived in a "critical condition".

Triplets thrive months after mum dies in childbirth

Martin Magaoa with the triplets and son Tanner Magaoa, 6. Photo / Jo-Photography

Chervonne Magaoa died shortly after giving birth to triplet sons

VIRAL VIDEO: 'This is how not to do a recovery'

The video has quickly amassed over 750,000 views

Pros and cons of the top lunch boxes

Back to school 2018: lunch box ideas.

Lunch box round up: we’ve put together pros and cons of each

Five tips to save on school shopping

Back to school shopping — especially when you have more than one child — can be costly.   Picture: Liam Kidston.

Top five tips to help you slash soaring costs of school shopping

Parents slacking on phone rules for kids

Australian parents are confused about setting healthy smartphone rules for their children, experts say, as two Apple shareholders demand the company takes action. Picture: Jack Tran

Australian parents struggling to set smartphone rules

The last hope for dying children

Doris Sun, pictured with her younger brother Oliver, before she was diagnosed with a fatal strain of brain cancer.

Why Aussies are heading to Mexico for brain cancer treatment