Plunge festival coordinator Lou Gumb with Maclean High School teacher/librarian Del Cameron at the Origami cranes exhibition so far created by Maclean High students at the pop-up gallery in Yamba.
Plunge festival coordinator Lou Gumb with Maclean High School teacher/librarian Del Cameron at the Origami cranes exhibition so far created by Maclean High students at the pop-up gallery in Yamba. Adam Hourigan

People power peppers Plunge Pop Up Hub with paper cranes

PAPER cranes are bringing the community together after Maclean High School joined forces with the plunge arts and culture festival.

Plunge festival coordinator Lou Gumb said the installation was bringing the community together and showing support for the students at Maclean High School.

Ms Gumb, who runs the Pop Up Hub in Yamba for the plunge festival, thought it would be a great idea to involve the community to match the school's goal of 1000 cranes.

"They were aiming to make 500," Ms Gumb said.

"But when we set up on Saturday morning, we realised the students had already made about 1000."

Working together with Maclean High School teacher and librarian Belinda Cameron, Ms Gumb put the word out through the community and on Facebook for people to make paper cranes and bring them in.

People are encouraged to write positive quotes on the inside of the cranes before they are made, reinforcing it as a positive exercise.

"A lady came in yesterday with 130 that she and her children had made," Ms Gumb said of the response from the community.

Plunge festival coordinator Lou Gumb with Maclean High School teacher/librarian Del Cameron at the Origami cranes exhibition so far created by Maclean High students at the pop-up gallery in Yamba.
Plunge festival coordinator Lou Gumb with Maclean High School teacher/librarian Del Cameron at the Origami cranes exhibition so far created by Maclean High students at the pop-up gallery in Yamba. Adam Hourigan

Teina Korb, who brought the 130 cranes to the hub, said they wanted to support the local high school as it was a positive exercise for a good cause.

"We really love the idea that each bird had a special quote inside," Ms Korb said.

With her two children Brooke and Dylan, Ms Korb said they had researched positive quotes and the whole family spoke about what the positive messages meant and which ones they liked the most.

While Ms Gumb doesn't know the exact number of cranes the community has made, she thinks it has reached at least 250 so far.

The idea came when Ms Cameron saw Year 12 students making the cranes then they were hanging out between exams and classes.

"You've got to make three and on the fourth one, you've got to find someone to teach," Ms Gumb said was Ms Cameron's rule for the project.

"We understand that not everyone can get here, but we still want people to be apart of it," Ms Gumb said.

A post on the Clarence Valley Culture Facebook page, asked the community to, "write a positive message here and we will make a paper crane with your message inside to exhibit at the Pop Up Hub".

The cranes will be at the Yamba Industrial Estate until Friday.



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