HISTORIC ACHIEVEMENT: Dr Eliza Kent and University of News England vice-chancellor Professor Annabelle Duncan at the wrap-up of the Lindt research project at the Grafton Regional Gallery. Prof Duncan said the UNE was pleased they were able to contribute to the project and make a difference to the community through an understanding of its history. Photo: Adam Hourigan
HISTORIC ACHIEVEMENT: Dr Eliza Kent and University of News England vice-chancellor Professor Annabelle Duncan at the wrap-up of the Lindt research project at the Grafton Regional Gallery. Prof Duncan said the UNE was pleased they were able to contribute to the project and make a difference to the community through an understanding of its history. Photo: Adam Hourigan Adam Hourigan

Project finished but the relationship is just beginning

THE relationship between the Clarence Valley and New England has become even closer thanks to the support and generosity bestowed our way by the latter region's academic institution.

Ever since the University of New England received a letter from Grafton Regional Gallery director Jude McBean in early 2014 seeking support for its Lindt photo identification project, the bonds forged have strengthened.

The culmination of that relationship was recognised and its tangible results shared with the Clarence community this week at the official closing of the Breimba: Looking For You research project.

RELATED: Three identified in historic Lindt photos as project ends

The outcome of the teamwork resulted in the identification of three of the Aboriginal people featured in those now iconic images taken by John William Lindt at the end of the 19th century, something Dr Eliza Kent from UNE said was far more than they thought they would initially uncover.

"Your local historian Nola Mackey did an outstanding job on the pilot project and took it to one level. It was our job to take it to the next stage, one of the best results being the concrete identification in Mary Ann Cowan."

Dr Kent guided researchers Annika Korsgaard and Robert Skinner over the six- month period which was partially funded by the State Government, along with the UNE.

"It was never just about the photos, but also about Aboriginal history in the Clarence. We really have just scratched the surface."

Dr Kent said it was "big puzzle that could go on forever".

"If people do have an interest in history there is a decent body of research there to access now."

The research material is available to the public at the Sir Earle Page library and held in the UNE archives.



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