The Member for Page Kevin Hogan delivers his maiden speech to the House of Representatives at Parliament House Canberra, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013.  (AAP Image/Alan Porritt) NO ARCHIVING
The Member for Page Kevin Hogan delivers his maiden speech to the House of Representatives at Parliament House Canberra, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. (AAP Image/Alan Porritt) NO ARCHIVING ALAN PORRITT

Hogan: Same-sex marriage change must be by plebiscite

MEMBER for Page Kevin Hogan has stated it would be a "breach of trust" for the issue of same-sex marriage to be dealt with in any other way than a plebsicite for this term of parliament.

In 2015, Mr Hogan was one of three National Party members to express their support for same-sex marriage laws to be changed, and supported the government's bill for a plebiscite at the last poll.

His remarks came this week, after the bill for the plebiscite failed to pass the Senate after Labor, the Greens the Nick Xenophon team and senator Derryn Hinch combined to defeat the bill.

"We took the plebiscite to the last election and it was endorsed by the community," Mr Hogan said.

"I am disappointed that the Senate decided to reject the wishes of electors to resolve the issue in this manner.

"A plebiscite was how both Bill Shorten and the Greens thought this issue should be resolved in the not that distant past."

These comments mirror that of Attorney General George Brandis in the senate, who argued that Labor leader Bill Shorten could have no objection in principal to the plebiscite because he said in 2013 'Personally speaking, I'm completely relaxed about having some form of plebiscite.'

Mr Brandis went onto say that "no-one can say that any individual who sits in this chamber or in the other house has any greater insight into, investment in or appreciation of what a marriage means than any other citizen of Australia," a view Mr Hogan said had been his long-held belief.

"I have long said changing the definition of marriage is a major cultural shift. For this reason I have said that the decision should be made by the community as a whole," he said.

"Given this is how we said we would resolve this issue, I think it would be a breach of trust with the voters to deal with it in any other way for this term of Parliament."

When asked whether statements from members of the Coalition stating they would not support the findings of a plebiscite had contributed to the demise of the bill, Mr Hogan dismissed the idea.

"If the plebiscite had passed the legislation would have passed convincingly in the chamber."



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