Simone Haigh from Wetland Care Australia braved pouring rain to take a group of 40 down to Angourie’s rocky shoreline yesterday, celebrating World Wetlands Day.
Simone Haigh from Wetland Care Australia braved pouring rain to take a group of 40 down to Angourie’s rocky shoreline yesterday, celebrating World Wetlands Day.

World Wetlands Day at Angourie

IF you wondered what a group of people were looking for on the rocks at Angourie yesterday afternoon, the answer is they were studying one of nature’s most delicate and interesting ecosystems, that of the rocky shoreline.

To celebrate World Wetlands Day, natural resource management graduate Simone Haigh took a group of marine enthusiasts to the rocks to share her knowledge of rocky shorelines and the importance of protecting this very accessible marine environment.

“They are an important part of the oceanic marine food web, providing a lot of food for commercial and recreational fish in the form of invertebrates,” Ms Haigh said.

“Rocky shorelines protect against erosion and storm surges and are able to cope with increases in salinity and temperatures and fresh water inundation from heavy rain.

“They are a very difficult place to live.”

Ms Haigh said the biggest challenges affecting our rocky shorelines were pollution from land run-off, litter – especially fishing equipment, trampling from crowds, over-collection of species and the potential effects of climate change.



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