Drew Cookson, Dean Hambly and Bradley de Martino Rosaroll test out the newly installed beer system at the CRJC.
Drew Cookson, Dean Hambly and Bradley de Martino Rosaroll test out the newly installed beer system at the CRJC.

Saddle up for a better coldie

BEER drinking at the races will join the 21st century at today’s Grafton race meeting.

At a cost of $35,000 the Clarence River Jockey Club (CRJC) has installed a state-of-the-art glycol system that went on line yesterday, just in time for today’s meeting.

The new system replaces the ageing Temprite system that began falling out of favour in many licensed establishments about 15 years ago.

According to the man who installed the system for the Clarence River Jockey Club (CRJC), Col Cheetham, the glycol system has two advantages over the old system.

“It cuts down on beer waste. Wastage from a glycol system normally varies between one and 0.5 per cent, where a poor Temprite system might waste up to 10 per cent,” he said.

Mr Cheetham said the other advantage was that beer could be kept at a consistent temperature, which made handling the product easier.

“The main problem with the older systems was that it was hard to keep the beer at a constant temperature,” he said.

Mr Cheetham said this resulted in beer becoming “fiery” at the keg, frothing up and proving hard to pour. The stable temperature makes it easier to ensure the beer comes out at the temperature Aussie drinkers love – around one-degree Celsius.

CRJC bar manager Wayne Phillips said the new system allowed beer to be maintained at a consistent temperature.

“The idea is to give patrons a better quality beer as well as make the value of keg sales a whole lot better,” he said.

“There has been a slight drop in the keg beer sales at recent meetings, maybe because the beer wasn’t a consistent temperature.

“It could come out at three degrees at one end of the bar and one degree at the other end. With this system the beer temperature is all the same.”



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