The Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphones can be used to charge other devices wirelessly Picture: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson/ News Corp Australia
The Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphones can be used to charge other devices wirelessly Picture: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson/ News Corp Australia

Samsung debuts could be the Apple AirPods killer

SAMSUNG has announced a raft of new smartphone and wearable products, including the first generation of its wireless earbuds under the Galaxy name.

The Korean tech giant unveiled some exciting new products at the Unpacked event this morning. With all the hype around foldable phones and 5G handsets, it was easy to overlook the new Galaxy Buds.

The wireless earbuds look set to replace the Gear IconX range as Samsung's de facto earbuds.

They have a similar look that will likely please familiar Samsung customers and are designed to be comfortable during general use and workouts with an ergonomic shape that stays in your ear.

Not too sure about that yellow colour mind you. Picture: Eric Risberg
Not too sure about that yellow colour mind you. Picture: Eric Risberg

They have an adaptive dual microphone system that uses one inner microphone and one outer microphone in each earbud which enables them to deliver your voice clearly in both loud and quiet environments when making phone calls, the company says.

The outside of the Buds have control functions. By tapping and holding the earbud it will pause your audio and let you listen to the outside world.

A feature called Enhanced Ambient Sound, which you can toggle in an out of, allows you to hear your surroundings clearly even while the buds are in your ears.

 

Just like Apple's AirPods that allow you to engage with Siri, the Galaxy Buds are able to be controlled via voice with Samsung's Bixby AI assistant, which can now recognise three new languages - German, Italian and Spanish.

By engaging Bixby, you can use your voice to make calls, send text messages or check the battery life of the earbuds.

They are priced at a similar price point to Apple's AirPods, but $20 more at $249. The company is clearly hoping it can replicate some of Apple's success in this space.

The AirPods have the highest satisfaction rate of any Apple product and have even become somewhat of a status symbol among younger users.

The Galaxy Buds have at least one thing over their beloved competitor: wireless charging.

The case of the Galaxy Buds can be charged wirelessly - a feature that Apple users have long been waiting for and is rumoured to be coming to the next AirPods. This is particularly exciting given that more smartphones are coming out with the ability to act as a charging pad, including Samsung's Galaxy S10, announced this morning.

The Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphones can be used to charge other devices wirelessly. Picture: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson/News Corp Australia
The Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphones can be used to charge other devices wirelessly. Picture: Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson/News Corp Australia

We don't know yet exactly how long it will take to charge the buds via this method compared to plugging in a USB-C cable, but it will certainly come in handy.

According to Samsung, they offer up to six hours of Bluetooth streaming and up to five hours of calls per charge. That is an hour longer than their Apple equivalent when listening to audio.

They come in a canary yellow colour which is rather striking and also come in more customary black and white options.

You can pre order the Galaxy Buds in the company's online Australian store from today for $249.

Can Samsung replicate Apple’s success with the AirPods?
Can Samsung replicate Apple’s success with the AirPods?


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