Screening halves breast cancer deaths

WOMEN who get regular breast screenings can halve their risk of dying from breast cancer, new research from the University of Melbourne has found.

A study of about 4000 Western Australian women - one of the largest studies of its type in the world - analysed data from the state's BreastScreen program.

University of Melbourne research fellow Dr Carolyn Nickson said the findings reaffirmed the importance of mammography.

The research team analysed 427 cases of women who died from breast cancer, against 3650 women who were still alive when the others died.

After comparisons with other similar studies, it found those women who received regular breast screenings had a 49% reduced risk of dying from breast cancer.

"Early detection is the key to early treatment and the free BreastScreen program is the best health service available to detect breast cancers earlier in women aged 50-69 years." Dr Nickson said.



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