Serial court pest's campaign against neighbours ends

JUST when the NSW judiciary thought they had seen the last of serial court pest Beverly Viavettene, the Murwillumbah mother launched a last ditch attempt to convince authorities that her neighbours were out to get her.

Now, six months after she was declared a vexatious litigant and barred from NSW court rooms, her relentless campaign against her neighbours, local magistrates and the police, has finally been brought to an end.

In the many years that Viavettene has been at war with her Chillingham neighbours over her seemingly misguided belief they had been trespassing on her property, she continued to paint herself as the victim of an elaborate conspiracy, even taking aim at her own legal team.

When the proceedings were before the Lismore, Murwillumbah and Sydney courts - one application made it all the way to the High Court of Australia - she repeatedly failed to appear to justify her accusations or defend claims made against her.

On several occasions, costs have been awarded against her and criminal convictions recorded.

In a letter to the NSW Supreme Court, which included 475 documents, Viavettene applied for leave to appeal and to have the proceedings heard in Lismore on the grounds she was "in poverty", relying on food vouchers, suffering a spinal injury as a result of being assaulted by one of the neighbours and could not travel to Sydney.

She claimed her children were at risk from "continuing intimidation and stalking" and went as far to ask for "an order or direction" that police were to protect her property and family.

She also asked that all orders, convictions and costs associated with her previous court cases be set aside.

Her actions were this week described by NSW Supreme Court judge Justice Ian Harrison as "wholly and unambiguously without any valid or worthwhile foundation of any kind".

He said he found it difficult to "make any sense of the application" and said it was "time her persistent litigious excursions came to an end".

The application was dismissed, without costs.



UP CLOSE: Portrait's of Grafton's Anzac spirit

premium_icon UP CLOSE: Portrait's of Grafton's Anzac spirit

An intimate set of portraits and stories from some of our servicemen

Controversial park is ready to go

Controversial park is ready to go

Despite initial community backlash, McLachlan Park fix-up complete

How much is the Archibald Prize really worth for us?

premium_icon How much is the Archibald Prize really worth for us?

Grafton gallery experiences the blockbuster effect

Local Partners