Footage shows woman being attacked and dragged away by tiger

THE daughter of a woman mauled to death by a protected tiger has demanded $305,500 compensation from a Beijing safari park.

Chinese national Ms Zhou was attacked by the animal while attempting to rescue her daughter Zhao, who had been dragged away by the hungry tiger moments before, The Sun reports.

The Badaling Wildlife World tragedy, which was captured on CCTV, happened after the pair got out of the safari vehicle they were travelling in following an argument.

According to reports in Chinese media, the tiger pounced on the daughter before dragging her off.

In a bid to rescue her daughter, Ms Zhou leapt from the vehicle and was attacked by a second tiger, mauling her to death.

The footage shows the tiger coming up behind the woman and pulling her to the ground. Picture: CCTV/Supplied
The footage shows the tiger coming up behind the woman and pulling her to the ground. Picture: CCTV/Supplied

Daughter Zhao sustained serious injuries in the attack and has apparently been left disabled.

Zhao's mother is seen leaping from the car moments before she is mauled to death. She is now suing the wildlife park for a 1.55 million yuan payout ($AU305,500), and has called on the park to bear part responsibility for her mother's death on July 23, 2016.

The animal then drags her off as her parents run after her. Picture: CCTV/Supplied
The animal then drags her off as her parents run after her. Picture: CCTV/Supplied

A previous official investigation into the incident ruled that there were no safety concerns at the park and cleared the business of any wrongdoing.

The payout petition apparently includes 1.25 million yuan ($AU246,500) to cover Ms Zhou's funeral cost, life expenses for Ms Zhou's dependants and consolation compensation for Ms Zhou's family members.

It also included 310,000 yuan ($AU61,000) for Ms Zhao to cover her surgery fees and lost wages.

Siberian tigers are a protected species in China and are listed as endangered animals by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The 6,000-acre wildlife park previously allowed people to drive themselves through the facility, or join a guided tour.

Since the tragedy, self-driving tours of the tiger enclosure have been banned, with "do not get out of the car" signs clearly installed at the entrance.

This article was originally published by The Sun and appears here with permission.



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