LEARNING EXPERIENCE: Swedish guitarist Johannes Moller held a special workshop before his concert at the Clarence Valley Conservatorium on Saturday, March 21.
LEARNING EXPERIENCE: Swedish guitarist Johannes Moller held a special workshop before his concert at the Clarence Valley Conservatorium on Saturday, March 21.

Show must go on with concert livestreamed

WITH the remainder of his world tour now in doubt due to the spreading coronavirus pandemic, Swedish guitarist Johannes Moller enjoyed the opportunity to perform a concert at the Clarence Valley Conservatorium in slightly unusual circumstances.

Only 30 tickets were sold to the guitarist's concert so that a strict 1.5m social distancing policy could be implemented, but many more tuned in to the live stream broadcast of the performance.

As the coronavirus pandemic sees more and more live events forced to cancel, Mr Moller said live online performances may be the way of the future for the time being.

"I've done livestreams before but I think it's a very good way to do it and I'm very glad we could do it because it might be a while before I can do a concert again," he said.

"I'm glad this one happened, I think the livestream is a very good idea. People could tune in from home and I'm happy with that.

"I'm about to release a new album so we'll do that online now but there's no more performances planned now so we will have to see what will happen, it could be a chance to go on a different journey to renew myself but we will see what happens."

Before the concert Mr Moller held a special workshop for guitarists to learn from the classical guitarist.

"I'm glad we could do it, everybody had quite a different style of guitar but I hope everyone could learn something," he said.

Mr Moller was scheduled to continue his Australian tour later this month with dates in Queensland and then New Zealand, however the coronavirus pandemic has meant his concerts have all but been cancelled.

Mr Moller said he was staying positive and looking to see what opportunities were available to him.

"I think we are lucky to have the online ability and we're going to see a lot of things go online, teachers have to do online teaching and already a lot of people have asked about creating teaching material online so maybe now is the time to do it, do some more recording and get creative," he said.



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