Dulux's Kinship palette in action. Wall (upper): Dulux Natural White. Wall (lower): Beige Artifacts. Partition: Dulux Sassy. Styled by Bree Leech.
Dulux's Kinship palette in action. Wall (upper): Dulux Natural White. Wall (lower): Beige Artifacts. Partition: Dulux Sassy. Styled by Bree Leech. Mike Baker

The home is hue you are

The change of seasons calls for change in scenery - not just in our backyards, but our homes too. Many home owners take advantage of the Easter break to get stuck into some DIY projects.

If you're guilty of trend-dressing your home, then take a cue from the experts of the design world before you hit the hardware store.

We asked some of the industry's leading names for their autumn interior trend predictions as well as what the rest of the world is obsessed with in 2018. There's a few surprises.

 

Dulux Kinship palette bedroom inspiration. Wall (upper): Dulux Natural White. Sideboard: Dulux Maiko. Styled by Bree Leech.
Dulux Kinship palette bedroom inspiration. Wall (upper): Dulux Natural White. Sideboard: Dulux Maiko. Styled by Bree Leech. Mike Baker

PAINT

 

Deep oranges and burgundies are synonymous with autumnal colour palettes.

While shades of almond, cognac and rust might sound like a 1970s hangover, interior forecasters challenge you to go to ground with your colour palette this season - sans mission brown, phew!

Dulux's autumn Kinship swatches are inspired by "traditional cultures and folklore".

Think burnt leaves underfoot, warm terracotta, russet and soft grey-greens with pops of vibrant red with an Eastern influence. In fact, Sage green has been touted by some as the new neutral of 2018.

Team these sophisticated earthy shades with light, cosy neutrals and tribal-inspired textured furnishings - perfect for creating a cocooning and nurturing space as winter approaches. The palette works particularly well with natural material like warm timbers, stone and linens.

Get the look: The key is to pair earthen colours with a complementary white or neutral that boasts similar undertones.

This will create a sense of balance, allowing the bold hues to enhance rather than overwhelm a space, says The Design Chaser's Michelle Halford.

Dulux Natural White, for example, is a warm white that sits beautifully alongside the pinkish and heathery hues of Maiko and Time Capsule, while Dulux White on White is a cooler white.

"Paint the fireplace surround or create an eye-catching feature wall with one of the bolder colours in the Kinship palette, such as Dulux Very Terracotta or Sassy, and keep the other walls soft and neutral," Michelle suggests.

"Or, for a more low-key effect, pair a muted green such as Dulux Hildegard or Herbalist with a cool white."

In small doses, these rich colours can have big impact. Consider repainting the front door, the edge of shelving, a storage nook or around a door frame.

Or create a stunning tonal vignette for very little outlay by painting a medley of op shop vessels in similar shades of the one colour and displaying them on a hallway table or mantelpiece.

The one definite with interiors, says Dulux colour expert Andrea Lucena-Orr, is that they're always moving forward. "Some trends will remain from one cycle to the next, but closer inspection will reveal that slightly different textures, patterns or undertones are at play every time.

"Paint is such an easy and affordable way to keep your interiors up to date, and pushing yourself out of your comfort zone colour-wise can be incredibly fun and rewarding. Best of all, if a colour isn't what you're looking for, you can easily change it."

 

The 'organic luxe' trend takes lead in kitchen design.
The 'organic luxe' trend takes lead in kitchen design. Freedom Kitchens

KITCHEN

 

In another turn away from white minimalism, charred greys are hot in décor but also in kitchen design. Contrasted against crisp white, black or grey can create a contemporary edge.

Freedom Kitchen's Susan Hasler predicts the colour-blocking trend in the home's heart is set to stick around, along with astute use of matt and textured surfaces.

 

Freedom Kitchen'sTobacco Halifax Oak benchtop finishes.
Freedom Kitchen'sTobacco Halifax Oak benchtop finishes. Freedom Kitchens

With the influence of open-plan living, the "organic luxe'' trend in living areas and surrounds is also having an effect in the cooking hub of the home, making these areas truly congruent spaces.

"Expect to see earthy tones and textures used in kitchens in a big way in 2018, creating a sense of raw luxury," says Susan.

 

Caesarstone's Concrete range presents the authentic look of a hand-poured concrete benchtop, which blends well with neutral palettes and raw timber finishes.
Caesarstone's Concrete range presents the authentic look of a hand-poured concrete benchtop, which blends well with neutral palettes and raw timber finishes. Freedom Kitchens

"Cool concrete, warm timber, and the look of natural stone are elements that are right on trend and will lend high end appeal to a contemporary kitchen.

"Combining different tones and textures ensures the look stays balanced, as well as creating visual interest."

Get the look: The latest generation of laminate surfaces look and feel like real timber, but are more friendly on the budget. Try Freedom's Tobacco Halifax Oak or "textured concrete'' cabinets available in light or dark tones.

MIXED METALS

 

Once an aesthetic no-no akin to wearing gold jewellery with silver, design rules have become more lenient in recent times to allow the mixing of metal tones.

 

A contemporary example of champagne metallic used to colour-block against charred grey cabinetry.
A contemporary example of champagne metallic used to colour-block against charred grey cabinetry. Freedom Kitchens

A subtle and sophisticated champagne gold can make a fabulous feature of upper run cabinetry, says Susan, while the sheen of platinum is the perfect way to continue the sleek look of integrated appliances.

"Gold, copper and brass sinks, taps and handles have been popular recently, but the latest version of the trend will see a use of mixed metallics in kitchen palettes," she says.

Get the look: "Team your champagne toned metallic cabinets with stainless steel tapware, or brass taps and stainless steel appliances, and still have it all work aesthetically," Susan suggests.

PATTERNED PLANTS

 

Inspired by "Jungalow'' styled interiors of seasons gone by, patterned plants are replacing ubiquitous succulents and those finicky fiddle leaf figs. The patterned varieties bring another layer of texture and depth to your interiors.

Get the look: Choose prayer plants, known as Maranta leuconeura, for their striking neon lime and dark green foliage. Another indoor star is calathea.

BLOCK-OUT BLOOMS

 

Statement blinds used against a sage wall colour. Roller blind from Luxaflex's Spring Bloom print collection. Pictured colour: Verona.
Statement blinds used against a sage wall colour. Roller blind from Luxaflex's Spring Bloom print collection. Pictured colour: Verona. Luxaflex

Choose printed fabrics with a focus on botanics and florals, both subtle or bold, to adorn your windows. Opt for warm but pale shades, says Luxaflex Window Fashions national marketing manager Jenny Brown, such as driftwood pink to create tranquillity.

"The other trend that will continue to evolve and stand the test of time is linen textures and designs," she says.

Get the look: Keep a neutral paint palette and let Luxaflex's botanic range of block-out blinds do the talking. If you'd still like to let some light in, check out the translucent range too.

FLECKED FLOORS

Terrazzo, the forgotten flooring of the seventies, is now seeing an upswing not only as floor tiles but also in bathrooms and kitchens alike, even jewellery and decor.

 

Terrazzo Side Table by Audenza. See audenza.com.
Terrazzo Side Table by Audenza. See audenza.com. AUDENZA

You either love it or you hate it, but this divisive floor finish is taking the lead from marble and concrete.

Typically made from recycled glass and natural aggregate, it's extremely durable, making it friendly not only for the environment but also your reno fund.

The trend has seen an upsurge of +316 per cent on Pinterest, also securing it a spot in The Pinterest 100 top pin trend predictions for 2018, based on user saves.

 

Large 'wall art' is taking centre stage as one of the year's top trends, as featured by Fenton & Fenton. More at fentonandfenton.com.au
Large 'wall art' is taking centre stage as one of the year's top trends, as featured by Fenton & Fenton. More at fentonandfenton.com.au Fenton & Fenton

THE FIFTH WALL

In 2018, we're looking beyond the four walls of a room to create artistic drama. Not to be confused with the dated feature wall, 'the fifth wall' uses striking wallpaper, bold or subtle colour or texture (like timber) to create a statement ceiling.

 

A stylish example of the 'fifth wall', featuring Beacon Lighting's Airfusion Airmover five-blade ceiling fan in matte black.
A stylish example of the 'fifth wall', featuring Beacon Lighting's Airfusion Airmover five-blade ceiling fan in matte black. Lucas Allen/ Beacon Lighting

Another use of art in the home going to epic proportions is wall art. Think large posters and photography prints stretching floor to ceiling. Pinners have gone crazy for "big wall art" with searches up 637 per cent on Pinterest. Both trends you might recall from the last season of The Block.

Get the look: This approach works well in nurseries and kids' rooms to ramp up the fun factor. It's a clever tactic to bring drama to a small or narrow space, such as a hallway, where bold colour on the walls might enclose the space. Keep the walls white and save the statement for the ceiling.

PERFECTLY IMPERFECT

 

Wabi Sabi inspired bathroom, featuring Minka Aire Roto ceiling from Beacon Lighting.
Wabi Sabi inspired bathroom, featuring Minka Aire Roto ceiling from Beacon Lighting. BEACON LIGHTING

Do you enjoy a bit of JOMO (joy of missing out) when it comes to fashion and fads?

Well, this one's for you: taking the traditional and innovating it for the modern space of 2018 and beyond.

"This is where the old becomes new to create comfort within a space through the use of colour and texture," says Luxaflex Window Fashions national marketing manager Jenny Brown.

This concept applies to statement furniture pieces and decor too.

"Unsurprisingly, comfort and textiles enjoy a natural affinity and come together to exude a soft, gentle tactility."

This reinvention trend is linked with the urbanisation phenomenon. "From an interior perspective it's come about due to the amount of attention and information being communicated on human waste globally and the domination of nomad living."

Reinvention also lends itself to another buzzword in the interiors world in 2018: Wabi Sabi. This traditional Japanese aesthetic celebrates perfect imperfection. Think weathered timber and crackled paint.

Get the look: Elevate the old into the new. Dust off nanna's buffet and make it a statement. Hit the op shops, Gumtree, Marketplace and yard sales, you might just strike proverbial gold.

Don't be strict with layering textures, let them reflect your personality or the item's own history. After all, what are trends without a little renaissance?



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