Tim loves his gramma

THE second annual Gate to Plate has attracted both new producers, along with those who were involved last year.

Tim Coates of Tyndale Organic Farm has decided to again be involved in the event and will supply organic vegetables and pumpkins for the eagerly awaited Gate to Plate.

Tim and his partner Dianne Randall single-handedly run, manage and work Tim's 67-acre farm where they grow a variety of vegetables in rich, productive black flood mud.

And Tim's no ordinary gardener having completed a Bachelor of Horticulture and Agronomy at University of Queensland before beginning the hands-on work.

“We grow broccoli, cabbage, watermelon, citrus fruits, beans and of course our gramma, dry and Jap pumpkins,” Tim said.

“We use blood and bond, lime and manure instead of chemically-based fertilisers that starve the soil of trace elements and minerals.

“When you buy organic, you can expect a heavier vegetable, a fuller flavour and there are no surface pesticides.”

While there are plenty of good things that come from eating organic, there are some hardships when growing them.

“We do have higher wastage as we don't use anti-fungals so we do get some fungi.

“I firmly believe though, that you product is only as good as your grading system,” Tim said.

Last year, Tim won the Grand Champion Overall Exhibit at last year's Grafton Show and his 27kg gramma pumpkin was sent up to the Brisbane Ecca.

“This year, I will be back with a 20 plus kilo pumpkin,” Tim said.

To pick up some of Tim's fresh organic vegetables, call in to the Grafton Farmers market, the Alumy Creek, Maclean or Ashby Markets.

“When

you buy organic, you can expect a heavier vegetable and, a fuller flavour. ”



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