Tree lopping at Maclean High School will continue this week to create a buffer zone between the school and the flying fox camp.
Tree lopping at Maclean High School will continue this week to create a buffer zone between the school and the flying fox camp.

Trees lopped to expel Maclean bats

WORK is under way at Maclean High School to remove more than 20 trees as part of the Maclean Flying Fox Working Group management strategy to create a buffer between the school, its pathways and the car park.

The tree removal and lopping is being coordinated by the Department of Education and Training (DET) and is expected to continue this week.

Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water’s (DECCW) acting regional manager Brett Nudd said this latest work was one of a range of measures developed by the Maclean Flying Fox Working Group to manage issues associated with the Maclean flying fox camp.

“Students and teachers returning from their Easter holidays can expect to find significant progress has been made to reduce the impact of flying foxes on their amenity and in the prevention of bats roosting in this area and their droppings landing on the cars using the car park,” Mr Nudd said yesterday.

He said this latest work on the strategic tree trimming on the school grounds had been one of a number of other short-term actions developed with DET and the Maclean High School P&C.

The working group is also finalising a revegetation program to provide alternative flying fox habitat further away from the school buildings.

“The revegetation works will compensate for the loss of habitat within the school grounds and consolidate habitat around the Maclean rainforest reserve,” Mr Nudd said.

DECCW is assisting the Land and Property Management Authority to finalise a restoration plan for the rainforest reserve.

“The aim of this program will be to enhance the viability of this important vegetation remnant so that it is more resilient and provides better quality habitat for flora and fauna,” Mr Nudd said.

Lack of available roost habitat and canopy damage in the reserve are acknowledged as major reasons behind grey-headed and black flying foxes using trees in the school grounds this year.

“The healthier the Maclean Rainforest Reserve becomes, the less likely it will be that flying foxes will spill over into undesirable locations such as the school ground or residents backyards,” Mr Nudd said.



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