Grafton Salvation Army Family Store manager, Judy Salter with a bag an unknown collection company is looking to fill, upsetting local agencies.
Grafton Salvation Army Family Store manager, Judy Salter with a bag an unknown collection company is looking to fill, upsetting local agencies.

Unknown pink collector moves in

LIFE in Grafton's charity sector got tougher this week as a new and unknown commercial organisation entered the market for second-hand clothing and goods.

Leading charities who operate second-hand stores like the Salvation Army, Vinnies and Lifeline are far from happy with the development.

Earlier this week Salvation Army member Judy Salter, like many other Grafton residents, received a pink plastic bag in her mailbox.

Residents were asked to fill it with second-hand goods including clothing and leave it by their mailbox for collection next week.

The owner of the bag identifies itself as the Clothing Recycling Centre, a commercial operation that delivers used clothing to Papua New Guinea.

"Clothes going to PNG is a wonderful thing, if it does happen. But who are these people?" Ms Salter said.

What she does know is that everything collected by the Salvation Army goes straight back into the local community.

"We rely on what we collect locally to keep us going," she said.

There are already several recycling stores in Grafton, so a new venture could starve the established charity shops, said Vinnies day co-ordinaor Colleen Schaffer.

"We have enough to keep going but only just," she said.

Erin Hankin, store-manager at Grafton's Lifeline store said she received one of the pink bags but put it straight into the bin.

"I don't have a clue who they are," she said.



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