Valley's dire warning

THE warning is as simple as it is dire: either the Clarence Valley works to protect its unique biodiversity, or certain threatened species will not be around for future generations to enjoy.

That is the thinking behind Clarence Valley Council’s push to develop a draft biodiversity management strategy. A working group, with a representation from across the community and relevant government agencies, has drafted a plan to recognise and protect the Clarence Valley’s vast biodiversity.

It outlines a number of growing pressures and threats on the biodiversity of the area and names some of the Valley’s most iconic species, such as the coastal emu and koala, as being under direct threat.

The draft aims to accommodate population growth and maintain productive land for agriculture in a way that is sustainable and maintains and improves biodiversity.

Today, councillors will have the option to adopt the draft strategic plan, following the recommendations of council officers.

If the protection tool is adopted it will be put on public exhibition for two months for community consultation.

The report reads: “Threatened species will not be around for future generations if we are not pro-active in managing our unique biodiversity.

“While there are many actions such as noxious weeds control, animal control or estuary management that are already resourced there are many that will require additional resources from both council and other sources if council is to meet its commitments as outlined in the 10 year strategic plan.”



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