Distress beacon causes distress

FOLLOWING an extensive false-alarm search yesterday on Sydney’s northern beaches that cost taxpayers upwards of $5000, people have been reminded to dispose of distress beacons properly.

The advice comes from the Westpac Lifesaver Rescue Helicopter Service and the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Rescue Coordination Centre.

“People and organisations can dispose of their unwanted beacons at no cost by placing them in collection bins in any of the Battery World stores around Australia,” Westpac Lifesaver service general manager Stephen Leahy said.

“It is becoming a regular occurrence for our helicopters to be tasked by the authorities to search for distress beacons that have been thrown away carelessly.”

AMSA’s concern is that resources are potentially being diverted away from search and rescue operations when distress beacons are inadvertently activated.



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