OH NUTS: Grafton Public School student Alex Fischer, 11, with some of the pecan nuts he is collecting from the trees before they are removed from the school. Photo: Adam Hourigan
OH NUTS: Grafton Public School student Alex Fischer, 11, with some of the pecan nuts he is collecting from the trees before they are removed from the school. Photo: Adam Hourigan

Tree removal divides opinions

WHEN even the experts have differing opinions, just who do you believe?

The arborist calling for all 27 pecan trees at Grafton Public School to be removed, or the one calling for them to be saved?

Maclean arborist Graham Beamer of Beamer Tree Services said he disagreed with Brisbane company Treescience, who initially assessed the trees, and had faith they could be saved.

"I don't agree they should all be removed; I feel they can be remediated," Mr Beamer said.

"Yes some may have to be removed, but I think to take them all is a drastic measure."

Mr Beamer said if he had done the assessment, he would have come up with a different solution.

"I think if another arborist was asked to carry out an inspection, they would come to a different conclusion," he said.

"I would have retained them and done some remediation work to revive them."

Mr Beamer had concerns about the brief that was given from the department of education, and the conclusion that was drawn in the report.

"I really don't think the guidelines in the brief from the department have been followed correctly," he said.

"The brief was to find any trees that proposed significant risk - these trees don't pose significant risk."

On the other side of the fence is South Grafton arborist George Tillman of George's Tree Services and Lawn Mowing who said Treescience was spot on.

"They are a danger," Mr Tillman said.

"They have diseases in them that eat them from the inside out.

"The branches will fall off - it's only got to rain and there is too much weight on the branches, or even a lot of wind."

Mr Tillman said the safest option for school children was to remove all 27 pecan trees.

"It could be their kid walking under the tree that could be next. It's as simple as that," he said.

But, Mr Tillman and Mr Beamer do agree on something: the trees would not be in this position if they had been pruned correctly previously.

"About eight or nine years ago, the fellow who pruned them, pruned them all wrong," Mr Tillman said.

"He cut them in the wrong places."

Mr Beamer said the trees had been lopped, not pruned, and to a standard that did not fit with Australian standards.

"These decay problems are because the person who lopped them hasn't worked with the tree and how it responds to pruning," he said.

Despite the decay, he remained firm the majority of the trees could be revived.



KOSCIUSZKO CALLING: Grafton galloper locks in elusive slot

premium_icon KOSCIUSZKO CALLING: Grafton galloper locks in elusive slot

BELFLYER will jump in the $1.3 million feature sprint at Randwick.

THUNDER CLAP: City cool under grand final pressure

premium_icon THUNDER CLAP: City cool under grand final pressure

GRAFTON netball grand finals end iun thrilling fashion.

Laurie putting his stamp on league

premium_icon Laurie putting his stamp on league

FORMER Magpies junior misses out on grand final glory.

Local Partners